Speak up about your symptoms

It can be hard to explain all of your symptoms

If you don't speak up, your gynecologist may assume you're not in pain. It only takes a few minutes to prepare for a productive conversation with your gynecologist. Answer a few questions to create a custom discussion guide to make the most out of your appointment.

After completing this discussion guide, share your results with your doctor.

Please note: this guide is not meant to diagnose endometriosis.



Endometriosis discussion guide


First, has a doctor told you that you have endometriosis?



Please answer this question.




Remember to schedule a specific appointment with your doctor to discuss your pain. When you call, make sure to bring up your symptoms and how they may affect your daily activities.

Doctor Discussion Guide

(All questions are optional)

Rate your pain symptoms on a scale of 0-10: (0 being no pain at all; 10 being the worst pain)

Chart scale to measure level of pain

No Pain

Moderate Pain

Worst Pain

Painful periods: Pain in your lower stomach (lower back, abdomen, or pelvic region) during your period:
Your doctor may call this dysmenorrhea (DIS-men-uh-REE-uh).

No Pain

Moderate Pain

Worst Pain

Pelvic pain in between periods: Pain in your lower stomach (lower back, abdomen, or pelvic region) when it's not your period:
Your doctor may call this non-menstrual pelvic pain.

No Pain

Moderate Pain

Worst Pain

Pain with sex: Your doctor may call this dyspareunia (DIS-puh-ROO-nee-uh).

No Pain

Moderate Pain

Worst Pain

This chart is intended as a guide and not an exact measure of pain. Concept by AbbVie based on the visual analog pain scale and the numeric pain rating scale by Bourdel. Adapted from Bourdel N., et al. Systematic review of endometriosis pain assessment: how to choose a scale? Hum Reprod Update. 2015;21(1):136-152.

Have you experienced any of the following? (Check all that apply)

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Do you have any other conditions or concerns? Such as:

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Do you have a close female relative diagnosed with endometriosis?

How long have you been living with pain? (eg, 3 months, since age 16, etc)

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Has your pain gotten worse over time?

Does your pain affect your school or work? If at all, please explain.

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Does your pain affect plans with family or friends? If yes, please explain.

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What treatment(s) have you used, or are you currently using to manage your pain?

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Please note any other comments or questions you may have.

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Download the answers to share with your doctor.

Review my answers


Remember to schedule a specific appointment with your doctor to discuss your pain. When you call, make sure to bring up your symptoms and how they may affect your daily activities.

When you talk to your doctor, remember to S.P.E.A.K. up about your pain

Here’s what you’re experiencing:



Painful periods
(dysmenorrhea)

{{vm.painPeriod >= 0 ? (vm.painPeriod) : 'N/A'}}

on a scale of 0-10

Pelvic pain in between periods
(non-menstrual pelvic pain)

{{vm.painPelvic >= 0 ? (vm.painPelvic) : 'N/A'}}

on a scale of 0-10

Pain with sex
(dyspareunia)

{{vm.painSex >= 0 ? (vm.painSex) : 'N/A'}}

on a scale of 0-10


I am currently experiencing:

Painful bowel movements or painful urination

Bleeding or spotting between periods

Heavy bleeding during your period

Bloating

Fatigue

Feeling sick or faint, or vomiting during your period

Difficulty participating in day-to-day activities because of excessive pain, exhaustion, or weakness

{{vm.exp_8_specify}}

I am currently NOT experiencing:

Painful bowel movements or painful urination

Bleeding or spotting between periods

Heavy bleeding during your period

Bloating

Fatigue

Feeling sick or faint, or vomiting during your period

Difficulty participating in day-to-day activities because of excessive pain, exhaustion, or weakness

I have other conditions or concerns such as:

Uterine fibroids (UF)

Painful bladder syndrome (interstitial cystitis)

Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Trouble getting pregnant (infertility)

{{vm.cond_6_specify}}

I do not have other conditions or concerns such as:

Uterine fibroids (UF)

Painful bladder syndrome (interstitial cystitis)

Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Trouble getting pregnant (infertility)



I {{vm.femaleRelative == 'yes' ? 'have' : 'do not have'}} a close female relative diagnosed with endometriosis.


I have been living with the pain for {{vm.painTime_specify != '' ? vm.painTime_specify : 'N/A'}}.


My pain {{vm.painWorse == 'yes' ? 'has' : 'has not'}} gotten worse over time.


My pain {{vm.painWork == 'yes' ? 'affects' : 'does not affect'}} my school or work. {{vm.painWork_specify}}


My pain {{vm.painFamily == 'yes' ? 'affects' : 'does not affect'}} my plans with family or friends. {{vm.painFamily_specify}}


The treatments I have used, or are currently using to manage my pain: {{vm.painTreatment_specify != '' ? vm.painTreatment_specify : 'N/A'}}


Other comments or questions: {{vm.painComment_specify != '' ? vm.painComment_specify : 'N/A'}}



© 2017 AbbVie, Inc. North Chicago, IL 60064 2055085-1924413


Not sure where to start? Here are a few examples of how you might S.P.E.A.K up to your doctor

S

Share your symptoms

P

Present your pain

E

Express your thoughts and feelings

A

Ask for your options

K

Know your next steps


“I am following the treatment plan you gave me, but I still have pain in between periods.”

“With sex, my 
pain is at least an 8.”

“Is there anything else I can be doing to manage my endometriosis?”

“What are my options moving forward?”

“How soon should I schedule a follow-up appointment?”



Don't hold back. Give lots of details and don’t be afraid to ask questions.
There’s no such thing as too much information in the doctor’s office.


What's next:

Schedule a specific appointment with your doctor to discuss your pain. When you call, make sure to bring up your symptoms and how they may affect your daily activities. Save the office’s phone number, so you can call if you have any questions before or after your visit.

Be prepared to talk about your past/current medications, as well as family history. If you are going to see a new doctor, make sure to have all of your medical records sent over.

Bring a notebook, pen, and these results to your appointment so you can jot down any important information your doctor shares with you, such as the date of your next appointment, next steps, or treatment options.

Consider talking to a family member before your appointment—or bring them with you (especially if they have similar symptoms). If they’ve been through something similar, they may be able to help you prepare for the conversation.

Download, email, or print this discussion guide to help have a conversation with your doctor about your pain and its impact.



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Share your results with your doctor.

Please note: this guide is not meant to diagnose endometriosis.